As the coronavirus continues to spread, many companies have restricted business traveling. As of this writing, there are 83 airline companies which have cancelled flights in response to the world outbreak while major hotel chains have temporarily halted 60% of their hotels in China.
If you’re a business traveler, your company has restricted business travel or if you plan to travel for business in the near future the following is meant to give you some assistance with regards to refunds, travel insurance, cancellation fees and coronavirus alerts.

Q: Will I get a refund if a ticketed event is cancelled because of coronavirus?
A: According to The Philadelphia Business Insider, “Most venues, ticket platforms, and resellers are offering full refunds (ticket fees included) when an event gets cancelled. These include national distributors like StubHub and Ticketmaster, as well as local organizations including the Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts and the Penn Museum.
However, refunds aren’t guaranteed. Eventbrite lets organizers set their own refund policies, making “no refunds” a policy option. In light of the coronavirus, Eventbrite has announced on its website that organizers should offer refunds (i.e. aren’t required) for cancelled events. They are offering to help any organizer with refund processing and are encouraging ticket holders to reach out directly to individual organizers.

Q: I purchased travel insurance; will it cover cancellations?
A: If you purchased travel insurance after late January 2020 when the coronavirus became a widely problematic for the travel industry, chances are your insurance will not cover coronavirus-related travel changes and cancellations.
InsureMyTrip, a travel insurance company discusses insurance on their website states that “for those purchasing travel insurance AFTER 1/21/2020 (exceptions may apply if traveling to a country with a Travel Health Notice issued by the CDC) benefits included in comprehensive coverage may apply in the following unforeseen scenarios”:
Emergency Medical Coverage: a sick traveler must see a doctor and/or go to the hospital during a trip.
Emergency Medical Evacuation Coverage: in rare cases, a sick traveler requires an emergency medical evacuation to the nearest appropriate hospital or back home for recuperation.
Trip Interruption: an extremely sick traveler cannot continue with a trip and must return home.
Cancel for any reason: Currently, if you are looking for trip cancellation coverage because you are concerned about the coronavirus, you will now need to purchase a plan that includes cancelling for any reason since the travel warnings are now foreseen. This benefit is time-sensitive and has other eligibility requirements, so not all travelers will qualify.
Some plans may exclude epidemics/pandemics and may not provide coverage for related issues. Please be sure to read the plan details carefully before purchasing.  The company also notes on their site, “We are currently experiencing a high volume of calls and emails from customers over concerns due to Coronavirus. We apologize for any delay in communication and are working to respond as soon as possible.”
In addition, on March 12, Business Traveler USA senior editor Lark Gould reported on new flight restrictions from EU countries with the exception of the UK.  U.S. President Suspends Flights Coming from EU Countries
"All travel insurance providers are now considering the coronavirus outbreak as a foreseen event," Squaremouth, a comparative travel insurance website notes. "This means there are limited, if any, benefits available relating to the outbreak."
Be sure to check the fine print of your travel insurance policy to see what is covered in the case of a public health emergency. Travelers may be eligible for benefits if they contract or are quarantined due to the coronavirus, depending on when they purchased their policy; however, flights missed due to coronavirus screenings at airports are typically not covered, Squaremouth notes.

Q: What If My Travel Supplier Goes Out of Business?
A: As the coronavirus continues to spread, many companies have restricted business traveling. As of this writing, there are 83 airline companies which have cancelled flights in response to the world outbreak while major hotel chains have temporarily halted 60% of their hotels in China.
If you’re a business traveler, your company has restricted business travel or if you plan to travel for business in the near future the following is meant to give you some assistance with regards to refunds, travel insurance, cancellation fees and coronavirus alerts.

Q: Will I get a refund if a ticketed event is cancelled because of coronavirus?
A: According to The Philadelphia Business Insider, “Most venues, ticket platforms, and resellers are offering full refunds (ticket fees included) when an event gets cancelled. These include national distributors like StubHub and Ticketmaster, as well as local organizations including the Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts and the Penn Museum.
However, refunds aren’t guaranteed. Eventbrite lets organizers set their own refund policies, making “no refunds” a policy option. In light of the coronavirus, Eventbrite has announced on its website that organizers should offer refunds (i.e. aren’t required) for cancelled events. They are offering to help any organizer with refund processing and are encouraging ticket holders to reach out directly to individual organizers.

Q: I purchased travel insurance; will it cover cancellations?
A: If you purchased travel insurance after late January 2020 when the coronavirus became a widely problematic for the travel industry, chances are your insurance will not cover coronavirus-related travel changes and cancellations.
InsureMyTrip, a travel insurance company discusses insurance on their website states that “for those purchasing travel insurance AFTER 1/21/2020 (exceptions may apply if traveling to a country with a Travel Health Notice issued by the CDC) benefits included in comprehensive coverage may apply in the following unforeseen scenarios”:
Emergency Medical Coverage: a sick traveler must see a doctor and/or go to the hospital during a trip.
Emergency Medical Evacuation Coverage: in rare cases, a sick traveler requires an emergency medical evacuation to the nearest appropriate hospital or back home for recuperation.
Trip Interruption: an extremely sick traveler cannot continue with a trip and must return home.
Cancel for any reason: Currently, if you are looking for trip cancellation coverage because you are concerned about the coronavirus, you will now need to purchase a plan that includes cancelling for any reason since the travel warnings are now foreseen. This benefit is time-sensitive and has other eligibility requirements, so not all travelers will qualify.
Some plans may exclude epidemics/pandemics and may not provide coverage for related issues. Please be sure to read the plan details carefully before purchasing.  The company also notes on their site, “We are currently experiencing a high volume of calls and emails from customers over concerns due to Coronavirus. We apologize for any delay in communication and are working to respond as soon as possible.”
In addition, on March 12, Business Traveler USA senior editor Lark Gould reported on new flight restrictions from EU countries with the exception of the UK.  U.S. President Suspends Flights Coming from EU Countries
"All travel insurance providers are now considering the coronavirus outbreak as a foreseen event," Squaremouth, a comparative travel insurance website notes. "This means there are limited, if any, benefits available relating to the outbreak."
Be sure to check the fine print of your travel insurance policy to see what is covered in the case of a public health emergency. Travelers may be eligible for benefits if they contract or are quarantined due to the coronavirus, depending on when they purchased their policy; however, flights missed due to coronavirus screenings at airports are typically not covered, Squaremouth notes.

Q: What If My Travel Supplier Goes Out of Business?
A: The impact of the coronavirus goes beyond the medical illness as concern grows over the long-term financial impact on the travel industry. Travelers may consider seeking financial default coverage as a precautionary measure in the event their travel supplier becomes financially insolvent. This specific coverage is already included in many comprehensive travel insurance plans and is designed to help travelers in the event their travel supplier has stopped business operations due to financial reasons. Usually airlines, cruise companies and tour groups are the kind of suppliers whose financial default would be covered under your travel insurance plan. Financial default coverage reimburses in-full only if you are unable to make alternate arrangements to continue with your travel plans. If you’re able to book another flight, for example, your benefits would then be adjusted according to the specific terms of your policy. This benefit is time sensitive and the time period varies by both plan and provider. Review your policy carefully or call our Customer Care team with questions about this type of coverage.

Q: What happens if an event isn’t cancelled but I don’t want to go?
A: You’re a lot less likely to secure a refund if an event isn’t officially cancelled.  Neither Ticketmaster, nor StubHub offer refunds if an event is still scheduled as planned.  If tickets were purchased directly through a venue, the recommendation is to contact the box office directly. Some organizations might be more flexible or offer alternatives. The Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts, for example, states on its website, “If you are feeling ill or are not comfortable attending your ticketed performance due to the coronavirus situation, we will offer fee-free ticket exchanges.”

Q: Coronavirus & Cruises - Common Traveler Questions
A: On March 8, 2020, the U.S. State Department issued a Travel Alert stating that "U.S. citizens, particularly travelers with underlying health conditions, should not travel by cruise ship" due to the increased risk of infection of COVID-19 in a cruise environment. Passengers with cruise travel already booked should contact their travel supplier for the latest information and their position on this statement. Some cruise companies such as Royal Caribbean are allowing cancellation up to 48 hours before sailing. Travelers who choose to cruise may consider travel medical insurance for their trip.  However, the situation remains fluid so check regularly for new updates.

Q: Where can I find out more information of travel insurance coverage regarding the coronavirus?
A: You can find out more on various sites:
 The impact of the coronavirus goes beyond the medical illness as concern grows over the long-term financial impact on the travel industry. Travelers may consider seeking financial default coverage as a precautionary measure in the event their travel supplier becomes financially insolvent. This specific coverage is already included in many comprehensive travel insurance plans and is designed to help travelers in the event their travel supplier has stopped business operations due to financial reasons. Usually airlines, cruise companies and tour groups are the kind of suppliers whose financial default would be covered under your travel insurance plan. Financial default coverage reimburses in-full only if you are unable to make alternate arrangements to continue with your travel plans. If you’re able to book another flight, for example, your benefits would then be adjusted according to the specific terms of your policy. This benefit is time sensitive and the time period varies by both plan and provider. Review your policy carefully or call our Customer Care team with questions about this type of coverage.

Q: What happens if an event isn’t cancelled but I don’t want to go?
A: You’re a lot less likely to secure a refund if an event isn’t officially cancelled.  Neither Ticketmaster, nor StubHub offer refunds if an event is still scheduled as planned.  If tickets were purchased directly through a venue, the recommendation is to contact the box office directly. Some organizations might be more flexible or offer alternatives. The Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts, for example, states on its website, “If you are feeling ill or are not comfortable attending your ticketed performance due to the coronavirus situation, we will offer fee-free ticket exchanges.”

Q: Coronavirus & Cruises - Common Traveler Questions
A: On March 8, 2020, the U.S. State Department issued a Travel Alert stating that "U.S. citizens, particularly travelers with underlying health conditions, should not travel by cruise ship" due to the increased risk of infection of COVID-19 in a cruise environment. Passengers with cruise travel already booked should contact their travel supplier for the latest information and their position on this statement. Some cruise companies such as Royal Caribbean are allowing cancellation up to 48 hours before sailing. Travelers who choose to cruise may consider travel medical insurance for their trip.  However, the situation remains fluid so check regularly for new updates.

Q: Where can I find out more information of travel insurance coverage regarding the coronavirus?
A: You can find out more on various sites:
https://www.squaremouth.com/press-room/travelers-guide-travel-insurance-for-coronavirus/
https://www.insuremytrip.com/travel-insurance-plans-coverages/coronavirus-travel-insurance/
https://www.allianztravelinsurance.com/coverage-alerts/2019-novel-coronavirus.htm