The Costa Rican tourism board has revised entry restrictions for US citizens. Beginning Sept. 1, residents of six northeastern states will be allowed to enter the country.

The six states are: New York, New Jersey, Vermont, Connecticut, New Hampshire and Maine, states where the “curve” of the pandemic is flatter than in other parts of the US, making Costa Rica one of the first international destinations to sort US travelers by state.


The selective policy points to the difficulties of smoothly reopening travel, given the unevenness of the pandemic’s effects, particularly on international arrivals and departures.

Travelers must prove their residency with driver’s licenses and must provide results of a negative COVID-19 test, the sample of which must have been taken 48 hours before arrival.

They must also prove that they have health insurance that is valid in Costa Rica and provides for up to $50,000 health costs and $2,000 potential lodging costs.

Passengers arriving from states not on the list on private planes will be “evaluated on a case by case basis,” the tourism board states. The same applies to passengers arriving by private yacht. If they traveled from a city or port not on the authorization list, and don’t have a negative PCR test, they will receive an order to quarantine for a number of days including time on the high sea after leaving their last port.